Friday, January 25, 2013

Adoration brings Revelation (Various, on Psalm 45)

This is a song of a heart bursting out in praise.  A heart shaped by the gospel. A song of the Lilies - a song of Spring time - of Passover. It is a song of Korah's sons, those dead but resurrected temple singers.

As Andrew Bonar noted Psalm 45 "is Earth taught by Heaven to sing heaven's infinite love to man. Every clause is melody, every thought sublimity" 

The song's subject:
Psalm 45 expresses a good matter, the good spell, or gospel. Christopher Wordsworth.
A heart that receives the gospel, sings the gospel. It sings of Christ. The Psalm speaks of "You"... The Christ:
Hero worship in his case alone is commendable. Our precious Christ can never be made too much of. Spurgeon.
"I have a passion, and it is He - He only." Count Zinzendorf.
There is a great connection between singing and seeing:
A loving heart has the power to realise its object. The eyes of a true heart see more than the eyes of the head. Moreover, Jesus reveals himself when we are pouring forth our affections towards him. It is usually the case that when we are ready Christ appears. If our heart is warm it is an index that the sun is shining, and when we enjoy his heat we shall soon behold his lightSpurgeon. 
-- a great warning to a preacher. Is the sunshine of the gospel shining on the church as you preach?
There is none like Christ. The beauty of men and angels put together is nothing compared to the beauty of Christ. Not so much as the light of a farthing candle is to the light of the sun at noonday. Edward Pearse 
The light is not hard to find... if Christ is our subject. And if Christ our subject then will not hearts be changed?

There is no writing like that dictated by the heart. Heartless hymns are insults to heaven. Where the fountain is good good streams will flow forth. The learned tell us that the word may be read overflows, or as others, boils or bubbles up, denoting the warmth of the writer's love, the fulness of his heart, and the consequent richness and glow of his utterance, as though it were the ebullition of his inmost soul, when most full of affection. We have here no single cold expression; the writer is not one who frigidly studies the elegancies and proprieties of poetry, his stanzas are the natural outburst of his soul, comparable to the boiling jets of the geysers of Hecla. As the corn offered in sacrifice was parched in the pan, so is this tribute of love hot with sincere devotion. It is a sad thing when the heart is cold with a good matter, and worse when it is warm with a bad matter, but incomparably well when a warm heart and a good matter meet together. Spurgeon
Let us sing, heart-full hymns! Let them be written! Songs full of Jesus!
Verses 2-5. In these verses the Lord Jesus is presented,
1. As most amiable in himself.
2. As the great favourite of heaven.
3. As victorious over his enemies.
—Matthew Henry.

"Let him be crowned with majesty
Who bowed his head to death,
And be his honours sounded high
By all things that have breath."
Henry Airway (1560-1616)

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